Exhibiting Artists

ORIENTAL, NC

The artist has blended her love nature with graceful pottery design elements using three clay bodies; porcelain, speckled brownstone, and an espresso brown clay. Pieces are completed both on the wheel and hand built.

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LEBANON, OH

We make functional and decorative stoneware pots that are fired in a gas-reduction kiln. By combining aesthetics and utility, our pots are both useful and attractive.

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LOUISVILLE, KY

Play surrounds and infuses the work: figuratively and literally. I also enjoy the use of alternative materials exhibiting creative ways to use cane and reed in handle assemblages for teapots.

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Fong Choo

GADSDEN, AL

All of my pieces are made individually by me. I do not consider myself a production potter or factory. All of my pottery is wheel-thrown and hand built. I do not cast nor use a mold of any kind.

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OXFORD, MS

My surface decorations are inspired by abstract expressionism. The implied gesture, movement, and boldness that abstract expressionism has achieved exhilarates me. Through the use of line and color, I am inspired to create bold and gestural surfaces in my work.

John Cummings

COLUMBUS, NC

I use a technique that incorporates wheel thrown segments which are woven into forms and combined with handbuilt sections, intending pattern to become an integral part of the finished piece. 

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BRYSON CITY, NC

Nature plays a large, inspirational role for both the design and decoration of my pottery. Inspired by my local environment, I use a rich, red clay that references our red mountain dirt of Western North Carolina.

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MARYVILLE, TN

To be a clay artist is to dig deep within, to be patient with the clay and the fire, letting the work and its maker find its voice.  Form may follow function at first, yet with time the two become symbiotic, finding no meaning in the absence of the other.

David Grant

HIGH POINT, NC

I see my work as an extension of my soul.  Each piece I create is infused with my inspiration, my dreams, my past experiences, and future goals.  Like the glaze medium I have chosen, no two pieces of my pottery are ever the same. 

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BOONE, NC

 I love the feel of the clay in my hands.  I love the thrill of opening my kiln.  A beautiful piece of pottery can take my breath away.  What else is there to say?  Clay is part of me.

Sarah Holmes

COMER, GA

All  my work is made from stoneware clay and fired to 2400F in a gas kiln.Most of my pots are handthrown on a treadle kick wheel 

(some pieces are hand built), decorated with slips and underglazes, altered in various ways and (again)mostly glazed with wood ash glazes.I have been a studio potter since 1985 and a student of clay (still learning) since 1974.

Tom Homann

LEICESTER, NC

I am first and foremost a functional potter and use a high temp white stoneware clay to create beautiful work that you can use daily.  I like to create extraordinary out of ordinary everyday items that I believe will enhance your life by using them.  

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Catherine Jarosz

DOVER, NJ

The artists' work is flirty and feminine which takes inspiration from textures, forms and colors common in a woman's life. The artist uses welcoming patterns, feisty forms and bright colors to make inviting work. 

WALLAND, TN

I have been a full time potter since 1973 and have worked from my rural studio in East Tennessee since 1978.  My passion in pottery is to create beautiful, hand made pots that people will use and enjoy in their daily lives.

Marion Schlauch

KNOXVILLE, TN

Judy Brater

WEAVERVILLE, NC

Making pots is about evolution. As long as I feel my work is progressing, then I don't worry. Not long ago,I tried to maintain control over surface and glaze.In reaction to that,I have gravitated to a looser way of making pots using glazes that I couldn't control even If I tried.My goal is to keep enough freedom in my work to allow these possibilities to take form.

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John Ransmeier

CHESAPEAKE, VA

I see inspiration everywhere I look and keep several sketchbooks going at all times. By sharing techniques and ideas with other artists, gaining inspiration by teaching and taking workshops across the country, I am constantly stimulated and motivated to make art.

John Tobin, Jr.

FRANKLIN, NC

Doug Hubbs

DURHAM, NC

Process drives my creative journey. I love the feeling of a form rising from a ball of clay, the raging uncertainty in the atmospheric kiln, and the joy of pulling out a successful piece, still cooling, and learning its story.

NORTH AUGUSTA, SC

I find working with clay to be liberating. My previous work in Scientific Illustration required me to be incredibly precise and technical. Working with clay and glazes, I have had to be willing to allow for transience and imperfection.

DILLSBORO, NC

Joe Frank McKee